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Jun 04 2013

9 for 9

I read an inspiring story today about a Sacramento teen named Lloyd Chen who was accepted to all 9 schools he applied to (this includes Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, and MIT). Since the young age of 8, Chen held fast to his dream of going to Harvard for college. Now he’s matriculating there with a full-ride…

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May 27 2013

Are We Experiencing a Revolution?

The teacher prep landscape has been shifting recently. Jonathan Schorr views the changes as part of a revolution in teacher prep. The question is an interesting one: are we experiencing a revolution? In Schorr’s view, the answer is yes. He points out the many alternative teacher prep programs that now exist. While each may have…

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It’s been so long since I’ve posted that I almost forgot how to log into this blog. I feel guilty about not having posted in so long. I hope it’s not a sign that, while in law school, I’ve “forgotten” about my longer-term commitment (and the very reason I went to law school): educational justice.…

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Jul 18 2012

Point/Counterpoint

I suspect this Onion article is poking some fun at TFA. Have a laugh, if you will: Point My Year Volunteering As A Teacher Helped Educate A New Generation Of Underprivileged Kids BY MEGAN RICHMOND, VOLUNTEER TEACHER When I graduated college last year, I was certain I wanted to make a real difference in the…

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I have a guest post today that I’ve been meaning to share for a while. Over spring break, I had the opportunity to sit down with Dave Cass, an adjunct professor at University of Colorado at Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Dave has held numerous positions in the world of higher education and is currently…

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I’ve been away from this blog for a bit. I’m making that final push at the end of my first year of law school. Classes are over and my first exam begins within 48 hours. But I wanted to share something. As I was studying today, I received a phone call from BO. It was…

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I recently discussed a (startling) case in which a homeless mother was sentenced to 12 years in prison for, among other things, “stealing an education.” This charge of first-degree larceny came after Tanya McDowell falsified her residency information in order to enroll her 6-year-old son in a neighboring school district. I thought it was crazy–yet…

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hgseaskwithwendykopp

Wendy Kopp was on campus Thursday as part of the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Askwith Forum series. She gave brief remarks about TFA before several current ed school students who are TFA alumni joined her. I wandered over from an amazing conference at the law school on “Closing the School to Prison Pipeline” (more…

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Mar 02 2012

On Stealing an Education

TanyaMcDowell

You read it right: an education can be stolen. Tanya McDowell, a homeless woman from Bridgeport, recently pleaded guilty to first degree larceny for fraudulently using her babysitter’s address to enroll her 6-year-old son in the neighboring town of Norwalk. As a result, she was sentenced to 12 years in prison. She only wanted a…

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Feb 17 2012

Housing and the Achievement Gap

It’s been almost 2 months since my last post. This is the longest I’ve been away. Law school is keeping me as busy as I was in the classroom. Anyways, I thought I’d share an interesting article I came across today–one that connects to both education reform and what I’ll be doing this summer: “Forum…

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Believe it or not, I’m still here and I still intend to keep this blog alive. I blame my first semester of law school for my lack of writing. Now that I’m on break, I finally have time to put away the massive casebooks and return to pleasure reading. Boy, did I miss that. Given…

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I recently watched “Whatever It Takes” as part of an event sponsored by an education advocacy organization here in law school. (Note: this documentary has no connection with the Paul Tough book of the same name on the Harlem Children’s Zone.) The 2007 documentary examines the progress of the Bronx Center for Science & Mathematics…

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Sep 29 2011

An (Unofficial) Renaming…

Despite the lack of a new post in over a month, please know that this blog is still alive and well. I’m no longer a classroom teacher, so I won’t be able to provide up-to-date anecdotes. But know this: I will continue to use this space to comment on issues in education, for whatever it’s…

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I received an email recently that looked a lot like spam. No subject line; a string of numbers followed by “@qq.com” as the sender’s address; poor sub-par writing mechanics. But thank goodness I looked more carefully–I was looking at an email from one of the students I worked with in China!: Im Polly,I hope that…

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This is part 2 in a series on my experience teaching in China this summer. Part 1 is here. Today’s theme: exchanges. ***** As I was boarding my flight out of mainland China, I picked up a copy of China Daily,  the local English newspaper. Until then, I had missed any chance of reading the…

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In this series, I’ll be reflecting on my experience teaching and working with Chinese high school students, using the photos and videos I took to supplement my reflections. Today’s theme: libraries. ***** Members of our group’s construction team spent the week building, essentially from scratch, an English language library for the local high school where…

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Jul 10 2011

Institute, All Over Again

I feel like I’m at TFA Institute. The odd thing is that I’m actually in Xiuning County, Huangshan City, Anhui Province, China. It’s main drag looks like this: 7,000 miles from the nearest actual TFA Institute, I am waking up tomorrow and teaching new students. I am and have been preparing lesson plans, gathering supplies,…

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I love the freedom of summer. This summer feels particularly unique because I know that I will be going back to the classroom as a student, rather than a teacher, this fall. But I’ll still be in my role as a teacher for a bit. A text conversation between a student and me shows that…

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Imagine for a second that you’re a student (“pupil”) in the United Kingdom today. You wake up and, ready to face the challenges of the day, select clothes to wear, scarf down breakfast and run out the door, eager as always to leave the house, see friends, learn something. Soon enough you arrive at the gate…

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Last Friday, I walked out of my classroom for the last time. Two years of teaching, done, just like that. Though I still haven’t had the chance to process that last day I will do so soon. This is, I guess, the first post of “Year Three,” made semi-official by Alumni Induction a few weeks…

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Two photos of my classroom, one taken… Before taking stuff down: and one taken… After taking stuff down (with the help of student labor): It’s been a great two years here in DCPS. Though there are things I will certainly not miss, there are many more things that I will miss. It’s over, folks. (Back…

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I know I want to stay “in education” for as far out in my future as I can reliably commit to. To this end, I’ve chosen to go to law school this fall. Of course, curious people continue to ask, “If you’re interested in education, why are you going to law school?” Though I may…

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Teacher: “Good morning, [custodian's name]! Sorry to bother you, but I have a request. Is there any toilet paper? The staff bathroom is out.” Custodian: “You know what? We’re actually really low on toilet paper right now. Like really low.” (awkward pause) Teacher: “And…?” Custodian: “And… Uhh, okay, let me go check the first floor…

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Alumni Induction is a milestone for most CMs, symbolizing two years of hard work, much of it thankless, some of it agonizing, and all of it memorable, and ushering in the opportunities, whatever and wherever they may be, to once more branch out into the world and use the lessons of one’s TFA experience to…

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The grass always seems to be greener on the other side. Here in the United States, we like to put the education systems of countries like Finland and South Korea on a pedestal. Finland is a phenomenon of sorts, after all. And South Korea tests really well on an international setting yet spends 30% less…

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About this Blog

Really, "A Blog Covering Dilemmas in Education": A (former) English teacher's reflections…

Region
D.C. Region
Grade
High School
Subject
English

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